Jan 06

Spitfire Review: The Greatest Showman.

Hello everyone,

All the way back in June I published an article called Top Five Fictional Animals and their Real-Life Inspirations. You can read that article by clicking here but during the research for that article I come across P.T. Barnum, founder and original owner of the Barnum and Bailey circus. Although I implied in my article that Barnum may have killed Jumbo the elephant (the inspiration for Disney’s Dumbo the flying elephant) I didn’t mention the other terrible acts Barnum was accused of. At first glance it seemed that Barnum was a terrific businessman but a terrible human being. With that in mind you can imagine my reaction when I saw the trailer for The Greatest Showman.

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Jan 01

New Year, New Goals, New Plans

Welcome to 2018 and welcome to my new website!

Why don’t you  look around? I’ll wait…

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Dec 03

Does Authorial Intent matter?

The concept of authorial intent is what the author meant to say in his or her work. What was the point? What were they trying to prove? What message were they trying to convey? For example the author of The Little Engine That Could  clearly wanted to convey the message “if you approach a task with a positive mind-set you can achieve your goal.” The problem comes when readers and critics misinterpret or ignore the authors intent and add their own meaning to the text.

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Nov 19

Review: Murder on the Orient Express (2017 film)

Does Murder on the Orient Express count as a Christmas film? There’s no mention to the time or date but it is set in snow. Anyway here’s my review of the 2017 film Murder on the Orient Express staring and directed by Sir Kenneth Branagh.

Spoilers ahead!

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Nov 12

Review: The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost

Hello everyone,

I’m not normally a fan of poetry, it isn’t my forte (although I did achieve a first in my poetry module at uni) but one of the poems I do know is The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost. This poem is taught in schools in the UK (I remember a copy of the poem being on wall of my English classroom) and since it a World War One poem and as it is  Remembrance Sunday  I thought now would be a good time to examine the “misunderstood” poem in more detail.

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Nov 05

Honourable mention in Metamorphose’s Magazine volume 3.

Hello everyone,

If you follow me on social media you’ll have seen that Metamorphose have published an extract of my short story The Elixir Men on their website, linked below:

http://www.metamorphoselit.com/2017/10/30/the-elixir-men/

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Oct 31

The inspiration behind five iconic monsters

Happy halloween! To celebrate halloween I’m running through the inspiration behind five iconic monsters. Ready? Set? Go!

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Oct 29

Spitfire Review: Turtles All The Way Down by John Green

On October 10th 2017 John Green released his latest novel Turtles All The Way Down.  Even if you are not a fan of John Green you might recognise his name, he wrote the novel The Fault In Our Stars that was adapted into an award winning film in 2014. John has written six novels in total (the first being Looking for Alaska which emotionally crippled me) and has many other achievements.

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Oct 15

Review: Boudica at Shakespeare’s Globe

Earlier this summer I attended a modern adaptation of Romeo and Juliet at Shakespeare’s Globe. You can find my review here, although traditionalists of Shakespeare met the performance with raised eyebrows I thought it was entertaining, well-acted and thoroughly enjoyable. A few weeks ago, I watched Boudica also being performed  at Shakespeare’s Globe. Although Boudica isn’t a Shakespearian play, (it was written by Tristan Bernays) it is certainly in the style of the Bard. How does it compare to the star – crossed lovers?

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Sep 16

Review: The Dark Tower

I’m a massive fan of Stephen King and although I don’t plan to watch IT (I’m not a fan of horror films) I have seen The Dark Tower adaptation. When I heard that The Dark Tower was finally being turned into a film I was excited… and apprehensive. Stephen King’s adaptations have an infamously chequered history. Some like The Green Mile, Carrie, It and The Shawshank Redemption (credited by some as the perfect film) are spectacular. Others such as Maximum Overdrive, Cell and The Graveyard Shift are complete misfires. Where does The Dark Tower lie on this spectrum?

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